Two Books on Believer’s Baptism


Last night, I taught children at Trace Crossing what Baptists believe about baptism. Using a catechism I have written specifically for children, I explained three important truths about baptism:

  1. Baptism is a command, not a choice
  2. Baptism is a picture, not a performance
  3. Baptism is a sign, not a saving act

The doctrine of baptism has been debated by Christians for centuries and will continue to be debated until we learn in the New Earth just how wrong all the Presbys were! But for now, I’m content to continue learning from those with whom I disagree and from those who are right. *wink wink*

In all seriousness, while my view of baptism is firmly planted in Baptist soil because I believe the Baptist position makes the most sense of the Bible’s teachings on baptism, I do not presume to have the upper hand on my Presbyterian brothers and sisters. I’ll admit that as Baptists, we could be wrong. However, for now I’ll stick with the view of baptism that teaches it as a command and picture of the gospel in which being immersed in water shows we belong to Christ and his Church.

I love recommending resources, so here are a few helpful books I used in preparation to teach baptism to kids. Consider grabbing both of these resources to increase your understanding of what Baptists believe about baptism.

Understanding Baptism (Bobby Jamieson)

Understanding Baptism Book

Jamieson’s short book on the basics of a Baptist view of baptism is well worth your money and time. It’s perfect for those of you looking for a brief and concise description of the what, why, and how of baptism.

Believer’s Baptism: Sign of the New Covenant in Christ (Tom Schreiner & Shawn Wright)

Believer's Baptism Book

Schreiner and Wright pack a heavy punch in their book on baptism. I believe their exegesis is convincing as they deal extensively with each biblical text relating to baptism. They even have a chapter on infant baptism, which helps with perspective.


17498999_1870940272931412_6999370580315029592_nMathew Gilbert is Associate Pastor for Children and Preschool at The Church at Trace Crossing in Tupelo, MS. He is a student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the author of Come to the Well: 50 Meditations to Fuel Your Joy in God. Mathew and his wife, Erica, live in Tupelo with their two boys, Jude and Jack.

God Provided A Way: Why Christians Need the Gospel


pexels-photo1.jpgWithout the gospel there are no Christians. It goes without saying that Christians need the gospel. Despite this truth, many Christians act as if they have no need for the gospel after the point of conversion. How often have you been sitting in a church service and tuned out a pastor who begins to explain the content of the gospel? Christians are tempted to think that once they have trusted Christ, there is no need to hear the gospel again. They think, “That’s not for me.” The job is done. What is the point of hearing the gospel week in and week out after one has already repented and believed? However, to cave to these tempting thoughts is spiritual suicide because of the sinfully seductive world we live in.

We live in a world filled with seductive sinful passions that entice our lingering flesh. Everything from television, books, magazines, and various websites tempt us to treasure pleasures that are fleeting at best and destructively damning at worst. We are also tempted with everyday social sins such as gossip. We all know the dangers of a prayer meeting gone awry, as too often we are left with a smorgasbord of gossip topics when we return home or head to work the next day. The destructive yet alluring “he said, she said” conversations can lure us in to the point that we are numb to the hurtful words that we speak.

These temptations and the rest are readily available to us everywhere we look on any given day. Facebook, Twitter, TV programs, newspapers, and casual conversations provide temptations to fall into sin at any moment. And if we are honest, we sometimes actively seek these venues in order to satisfy our sinful passions. Christians are called to holiness and to conform to the image of Christ (Rom. 8:29). So then, how is a Christian to live in a world filled with sinful seductions? How is a Christ-follower, a child of the Holy One of Israel, to survive in this daily battle of (or for) the heart?

The gospel of Jesus Christ is the primary means by which we fight and kill sin. If you want to overcome the temptation that is vying for your heart’s worship, look to Christ and his gospel. One tremendous benefit of these dangerous temptations is the fact that they remind us of our dreadfully sinful condition and the pre-grace predicament all of humanity is in from birth (Ps. 51:5). All the more reason why our eyes should gaze upon the glory of God’s grace in the gospel—the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ that provided the only way for us to be legally justified and paternally adopted by our holy and sovereign God.

Paul realized the necessity of reminding Christians of the gospel when he wrote to the church at Corinth, “Now I would remind you, brothers, of the gospel I preached to you, which you received, in which you stand, and by which you are being saved, if you hold fast to the word I preached to you—unless you believed in vain” (1 Cor. 15:1-2). Paul directly connects sanctification to reminding these believers of the gospel. Gospel reminders serve our sanctification.

The gospel is a sanctifying means of grace that we need on a daily basis. So as you take in your daily dose of sinful temptations through your conversations and mouse clicks, consider how to combat this satanic onslaught with the sword of the Spirit, the Word of God, and most pointedly, the gospel. God provided a way for you to be made right with him and for you to be made like his Son. Your holiness was achieved on the cross, but it is being worked out in you every second of every day (Phil. 2:12-13). One means for you to grow into this blood-bought and Spirit-wrought holiness is to meditate on the glory of God’s grace in the gospel.

Do you find yourself neglecting your need for the gospel? Do you yawn when your pastor preaches the content of the gospel? If so, know that this kind of thinking is perilous to your faith. According to pastor and author Mitch Chase, “leaving the gospel behind in pursuit of Christian growth is actually the abandonment of the path to Christian growth.”

One way to remedy this gospel neglect is to remind yourself of the undeserved gift of grace of the gospel often. One exercise that I have found helpful is to put the gospel into words from time to time. Take a sheet of paper or open a blank document on your computer and simply write out the content and benefits of the gospel. Focusing on the power of God in the gospel will allow your eyes to gaze upon pleasures that are unending in Christ (Ps. 16:11) and provide the assurance that your battle for holiness is indeed being worked out by God in you and will be achieved in the last day (Rom. 8:30; Phil. 1:6).

God provided a way for you to be made right with him, and he is still providing a way for you to flee and fight sin. The means in both cases is the same—the gospel of Jesus Christ—for your justification and your sanctification. Jesus died to cancel the debt of your sin, absorb the wrath of God against your sin, and free you from the slavery of sin.

Here is just one example of an articulation of the gospel by K. Scott Oliphint that may help you fight sin this week or this month:

Man fell from his original state and consequently lost the ability and the will to worship and serve the Creator. The covenant relationship that, prior to the fall, existed in harmony with the Creator’s will was, after the fall a relationship of animosity and rebellion on our side and was one of wrath on the side of the Creator.

But there was still a relationship. It is not that man ceased to be a covenant creature after the fall. He was still responsible to God to obey and worship him. He turned this responsibility, however, into occasions for rebellion. Instead of walking with God in the cool of the day, man began to try to hide from God, to fight with God, to run from him, to use the abilities and gifts he had been given to attempt to thwart the plan of God and to construe for himself a possible world in which he was not dependent on God at all.

So God provided a way in which the obedience owed him and the worship due his name could be accomplished. He sent his own Son, who alone obeyed the spirit and letter of the law, and who also went to the cross to take the penalty we deserve in order that those who would come to him in faith would be declared not guilty before the tribunal of the covenant Judge.


*This post first appeared as a chapter in my book, Come to the Well. You can purchase a copy from Amazon, CBD, and other book retailers.


17498999_1870940272931412_6999370580315029592_nMathew Gilbert is Associate Pastor for Children and Preschool at The Church at Trace Crossing in Tupelo, MS. He is a student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Mathew and his wife, Erica, live in Tupelo with their two boys, Jude and Jack.

March Madness Hope and Queen Esther: A Summary of Esther 8


rust-king-iron-bronzeEsther 8 ushers in the beginning of a final resolution to the story. Things have definitely started looking up for the Jews, but Haman’s death is only the beginning of their salvation, not the end. Much is still uncertain in Susa other than Haman’s decree that didn’t die with him. Esther senses the momentum she and her people have gained, and alongside Mordecai, who is elevated to Haman’s previous position, she pleads with the king for the salvation of her people.

Unlike her previous meetings with the king, Esther is not emotionally reserved this time around as she falls at his feet and weeps for her people. However, her cunning remains as she asks the king to save the Jews for her sake, not their own. The Jews’ only hope is not in the king’s kindness or mercy, but in his affection for the queen.

King Xerxes once again finds favor with Esther and gives Mordecai authority to write a second decree to combat Haman’s. Haman’s decree could not be revoked because it carried the authority of the king. So, a competing decree which nearly perfectly mirrored the first allowed the Jews to defend themselves against anyone who would come against them. The chapter ends as the kingdom’s fastest horses are sent out in blazing speed to take the new edict to the ends of the empire. The Jews who were once fasting and weeping are now feasting and rejoicing as they prepare themselves for battle against their enemies.

Mediation is an important theme in this chapter alongside God’s sovereignty in bringing about an ironic reversal of fates. Esther serves her people maybe not as the mediator they were looking for, but exactly the mediator they needed. Esther won favor with the king and won salvation from his decree of death.

Jesus is a better Esther. He stands in the place of his people and mediates for them before the King. Esther provides March Madness hope. When your favorite college basketball team wins another game in the NCAA tournament, they give you hope that they may win it all. But this hope is fragile. It is hope in a chance to win. The hope Jesus brings his people as their mediator is not like March Madness hope.

Jesus won favor with God the King through his sinless life and substitutionary death. But while Esther’s mediation gave her people a chance for survival, Jesus’ mediation gave his people a certainty of salvation.


17498999_1870940272931412_6999370580315029592_nMathew Gilbert is Associate Pastor for Children and Preschool at The Church at Trace Crossing in Tupelo, MS. He is a student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Mathew and his wife, Erica, live in Tupelo with their two boys, Jude and Jack.

Loving Delay: God’s Love and Glory in Your Suffering


mountains-nature-man-personChristian, have you ever prayed for something over and over again that resulted in no apparent answer from God, so much so, that it led you to question his love for you?

Battle of the Heart

This question is like a hardcore game of tug-of-war in your heart and mind. You know that God’s love for you is uninhibited, unbound, and unmerited. You know that he loved you despite your deliberate rebellion against him in sending Christ Jesus to die for you (Rom. 5:8). You know that God loves you because he adopted you; you are his child, and he is your Father. You know he loves you as the Holy Spirit sanctifies you and reorients your desires toward God. And you know he loves you because by his preserving grace you wake up each morning saying, “I believe in Jesus.”

Yet, at the same time, your heart is breaking at the sound of bad news; your faith is shaking with doubt, or your world has been completely turned upside down by tragedy, suffering, or some raging consequences of sin. You cry yourself to sleep at night. No one can say anything that can ease the pain. Broken relationships. Broken bodies. Broken health. Broken hearts. Just sheer brokenness fills your life. And so you pray. You pray, and you pray, and you pray. Each morning and afternoon, evening and night, you pray for God to lift the pain, cure the disease, mend the broken relationship. The cry of your heart could not be clearer. With the psalmist you cry:

I am weary with my moaning
every night I flood my bed with tears;
I drench my couch with my weeping.
My eye wastes away because of grief;
it grows weak because of all my foes (Ps. 6:6-7).

 Deafening Silence

But what comes out of these heart-wrenching prayers? What is the response of the God of the universe in whom you have trusted and to whom you belong to your humble, desperate cries?

…Nothing…

Silence. Piercing silence. Deafening silence. The suffering and the tragedy persist. The night will not end. You wonder, “Is God ignoring me? Does he even hear me?” This silence or delay from God seems surprising and uncharacteristic of his love. Can God truly claim to love us with the intensity that he says he does if he delays in answering our prayers?

I want you to see that in delaying, God is loving you. He loves you when you cry, “My soul also is greatly troubled. But you, O Lord—how long?” (Ps. 6:3). The basis from which all of this flows is the truth that God is love (1 John 4:8, 16). His love for you is not something that must be learned or acquired; it is crucial to his character.

Loving by Delay: Example from John 11

An example of this can be found in John 11, which begins with a request for help from Mary and Martha. Their brother Lazarus had fallen ill. It is clear that Jesus loved this family, for Lazarus’ sisters refer to their brother as “he whom you love” (John 11:3). The one whom Jesus loves is sick and dying, and the ones who Jesus loves are pleading with him to help. Mary and Martha call upon Jesus to demonstrate his love for them by doing something about the illness. Just to be clear here, a family that Jesus loves deeply has been struck with tragedy. A brother is dying, and his sisters are crying. His love for them is real and deep, and this is how he responds:

But when Jesus heard it he said, “This illness does not lead to death. It is for the glory of God, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it” (John 11:4).

The NASB uses the phrase: “This sickness is not to end in death…” Though Lazarus’ sickness would definitely lead to death in one sense (Lazarus does die), this illness does not end in death. In other words, the story does not end with Lazarus’ death. The sickness does not have the last word—Jesus does. But it may also be that Jesus says this with emphasis on the event’s purpose. The true end or purpose of what is about to happen is not death but rather the glorification of God in Jesus Christ. “It is for the glory of God, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.” So, the one central thing to Lazarus’ and his sisters’ suffering is the glory of God in Jesus Christ.

Two things are clear so far: (1) Jesus loves Lazarus and his sisters, and (2) the suffering of this family (Lazarus’ illness) has its end or purpose as the glory of God in Jesus Christ.

John now moves to focus on Jesus’ love. “Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus” (John 11:5). What John is about to write must be taken with this knowledge fresh on our minds. He then writes something shocking, surprising, and seemingly scandalous. What we might expect from John in verse six would be something like this: “As a result of this love, Jesus immediately went to Lazarus and healed him from this illness.” This is what we would expect from the love of Christ poured out on those whom he loves. This is what we expect from him when we are suffering: immediate response and immediate healing. However, the story goes much differently.

So, when he heard that Lazarus was ill, he stayed two days longer in the place where he was (John 11:6).

John reminds us of Jesus’ love for Martha, Mary, and Lazarus and then proceeds to tell us that the way he demonstrates this love is by staying two days longer where he was. He does not rush to Lazarus’ rescue; he delays.  In response to a desperate plea from the ones he loves, Jesus demonstrates his love by delay. The original Greek is much clearer than the English translation in verses 5-6. John essentially says that because Jesus loved Martha, Mary, and Lazarus, he delayed in coming to his rescue. Delay was Jesus’ way of demonstrating his love for his friends.

Reasons to Love by Delay

But why the delay? Doesn’t Peter clearly teach that God does not delay? “The Lord does not delay His promise, as some understand delay” (2 Pt. 3:9). If Jesus loved this family, why would he wait two (what ended up being four) days to come to them? I believe there are two main reasons.

  1. To Magnify His Glory

Remember, the end or purpose of Lazarus’ sickness is that God may be glorified in the glorification of Jesus Christ. When Jesus and his disciples finally arrived, Lazarus had been dead and in the tomb for four days. This is highly significant because of Jewish thought. At that time, there was a Jewish superstition that when someone died, the spirit of that person hovers over their body for up to three days, after which no resurrection or resuscitation would be possible. When Jesus arrives at Lazarus’ tomb after four days, there would be no question that any resurrection would be nothing short of divine. Nothing would be able to explain a resurrection at this point, and Jesus’ deity and glory would be on full display. Death does not have the last word. Jesus does. And he has the final word on your suffering as well. In the end, he will magnify his glory.

  1. To Magnify His Love 

How does Jesus show his love for this family in his delay? We have already seen that he shows his love for them by glorifying himself in Lazarus’ resurrection, which was magnified through delay. However, there is something more personally significant that happens when Jesus demonstrates love by way of delay. In his book Scandalous, D.A. Carson observes that oftentimes Christians act like immature children when we pray. He says this:

Sadly, many of us act like very young and immature children when we deal with God. We, too, want specific blessings now, now, now. But God takes the long view, and he understands that sometimes delay is what is best for us.

Our view of God is too often far too small. We view him, speak of him, and deal with him in human terms—and as Carson has demonstrated, childish human terms at that. Peter writes that the Lord does not delay “as some understand delay” (2 Pt. 3:9). Even though he is specifically referring to the second coming of Christ in this passage, it is clear that God’s delay is intentional and is not the result of some limitation of his power or love. Delay from God is evidence of his patience to accomplish his purposes in perfect timing.

Our view of God’s love is also too small. We feel that God does not love us if he does not answer or bless us immediately, but what we see in John 11 refutes that thinking. Jesus loved Martha, Mary, and Lazarus, and yet he delayed in coming to them. He did not immediately relieve their suffering. God does not always immediately relieve the suffering of his children, and it isn’t always the case that he relieves our suffering at all. In these cases, with Paul we must submit to the truth that God’s grace is sufficient (2 Cor. 12:9).

Suffering to the Glory of God

Jesus showed his love for Lazarus and his sisters by delaying in relieving their suffering. Therefore, delay does not imply lack of love or neglect but rather it implies a higher wisdom and grander purpose.

Not only that, but we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us (Rom. 5:3-5).

God is glorified in the joy of his people, and when his people find joy in him amidst tremendous suffering, the worth of God radiates from his suffering people. The vision of God that we must take up in order to accurately view personal suffering is that of Romans 5:3-5. This vision is that the increase of character, perseverance, and future hope is more important than relief from suffering. Paul would later write, “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us” (Rom. 8:18). One means that God uses to work this joy out in us is delay. God’s love through delay produces perseverance, character, and hope—hope that will never fail us and hope that vanquishes all need for relief.

D.A. Carson is poignant on this point: “God is sovereign. He is wise. He is unqualifiedly good. Part of Christian maturation is understanding that even his delays are not foolish or stupid or mistakes or exercises in whimsy. He is to be trusted, and even the delays are to be improved upon by the way we respond to them.”

Likewise, John Piper exhorts, “We can draw no deadlines for God. He hastens or he delays as he sees fit. And his timing is all-loving toward his children. Oh, that we might learn to be patient in the hour of darkness.”

Christian, when your suffering will not cease, when the darkness over your soul will not lift, and when you feel your prayers are going unanswered, know that this is one of the innumerably glorious and mysterious ways that your God loves you. His glory and love are magnified in his delay. You can rest assured knowing that the grand purpose in suffering is the glory of God in the satisfaction of his suffering saint. Find solace and identification through suffering in these words from Christian poet, George Herbert:

Ah my dear angry Lord,
Since thou dost love, yet strike;
Cast down, yet help afford;
Sure I will do the like.
I will complain, yet praise;
I will bewail, approve:
And all my sour-sweet days
I will lament, and love.

*This post first appeared as a chapter in my book, Come to the Well. You can purchase a copy from Amazon, CBD, and from many other book retailers.


Mathew Gilbert is Associate Pastor of Children and Preschool at The Church at Trace Crossing in Tupelo, MS. He is the author of Come to the Well: 50 Meditations to Fuel Your Joy in God and founder of Grace Satisfies. He is an M.Div student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Mathew is married to his high school sweetheart, Erica. Mathew and Erica live in Tupelo with their two sons, Jude and Jack. You can follow Mathew on Twitter @Mat_Gilbert.